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Hamlet Branagh Vs Gibson Essay Research Paper

Hamlet: Branagh Vs Gibson Essay, Research Paper

I am not a big fan of the 1990 movie version of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, starring Mel Gibson. I feel that while it stands alone as a very well made movie and contains great acting performances throughout, I think that it strays too far from the original text and layout of the play. The omissions and transposing makes the play weaker, and while it is a great screenplay, it fails in comparison to Shakespeare’s original work.

The three things which bother me the most are the omission of Fortinbras and the handling of the, “To be or not to be…” soliloquy and the “Get thee to a nunnery…” scene, and Hamlet’s Oedipus complex.

Omitting the subplot of Fortinbras took away the whole political aspect of the piece. It also weakened the ending. I understand that director Franco Zeffirelli wanted to keep the movie at a reasonable length, but I feel that his omissions took away a lot of the power of the original version. Maybe I am just a purist, but I much prefer the 1996 Kenneth Branagh version, even if some of the acting was weaker in it. But I would rather sit through four hours and see the whole play than sit through two and half and see a butchering of the text. I did not like that some of the long speeches were cut down and that some character said lines written for others.

I absolutely love the writing that takes us from the most famous speech ever written to the scene between Hamlet and Ophelia. The intensity of the “To be or not to be…” soliloquy into the “Get thee to a nunnery…” scene is my favorite transition ever written and I think they totally blew it in this film. I felt they through away the Hamlet/Ophelia scene and turned something beautiful into something boring. The only thing that makes it work is the great acting performances of Mel Gibson and Helena-Bonham Carter. Carter is superb as Ophelia, much better than Kate Winslet, who was great in the Branagh version. I was pleasantly shocked at the performance, especially the scene where goes insane after finding out her father is dead.

That is something else that greatly bothers me. I don’t like the way Gibson was directed to play the scene in which he kills Polonius. He doesn’t even play it like he cares that he did it. That also makes Hamlet seem like a man who does not have a mind. I read somewhere once that Gibson felt the same thing about the scene. Ian Holm gives a very fine performance as Polonius. Alan Bates also shines as Claudius. He gives such a fine performance in the role.

I am not a big fan of Glenn Close, but she was wonderful as Queen Gertrude. I just don’t agree with Oedipus story line. I don’t feel that the original text calls for it to be so played out. Shakespeare hints at incestual activities in a lot of his plays, including between Tybalt and his aunt in Romeo & Juliet. But I don’t feel it should be taken so literally. It made Hamlet seem as though he really was completely insane. That, to me, keeps the whole play from working. But again, as a movie, it works.

Mel Gibson gives a very fine performance as the tragic hero. The only times which he falters, it is due to the directing and re-writing by Zeffirelli. Gibson gives a much more true-to-life and honest performance than say Branagh or even Olivier did. He did a truly amazing job. Nathaniel Parker and Stephen Dillane did nicely as Laertes and Horatio. I would have liked to see more from the grave-digger scene. It didn’t have the comic relief that Billy Crystal’s performance in the Branagh version possessed.

Considering all the problems I have with it, the movie itself is spectacular. I have a very biased opinion, being that I know the script so well. Speaking of it as a screenplay and film, it is extremely well done. Zefferelli brings a flow of reality to the story and turns it into a fine film. The casting was perfect for his version and one scene in particular was great, the scene with Hamlet and Ophelia in the courtyard. I like that scene a lot. Gibson and Bonham-Carter are wonderful. I would just prefer to see the true version, over an adapted version. That is just my opinion.

Other articles

Gibson and Branagh in the Movie Versions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet Essay

Gibson and Branagh in the Movie Versions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet Essay

Hamlet is one of Shakespeare’s most well-known and most frequently performed plays. Many people have enjoyed reading and watching hamlet, both on stage and theatrically, Tragedy of Prince Hamlet revolves around the idea of tragedy, incest and revenge. However, Hamlet uses puns to lighten the mood.
Franco Zeffirelli’s version of Hamlet was released in 1990, with Mel Gibson playing as hamlet, Glenn Close as Gertrude, Alan Bates as Claudius, and lastly Helena Bonham Carter as Ophelia. The setting took place in Scotland, but in the movie was supposed to be filmed in Denmark around the 1300th century with the main theme being a tragedy, and they did a great job at trying to make the castle, and the landscape seem as uninhabited as possible, so there weren’t any modern day equipment.
From the beginning of the movie, until the end Hamlet is furious by the hasty marriage of Gertrude (Hamlets mother) to Claudius (hamlets uncle), especially since his father died only two months ago. Hamlet is quite literally mad, he even thinks about committing suicide and this is known because of the famous soliloquy “to be or not to be, that is the question”. However, hamlet is visited by ghost and is told that he was murdered by his Uncle by having poison poured into his ear and the king’s ghost asks hamlet to avenge the king’s death. Hamlet demonstrates his cleverness when he sets up a play which is very similar to what take place on the day that the king was murdered. Hamlet tells Horatio to observe Claudius’ reaction to the play, and if Claudius seems to be troubled by the play, that will confirm the ghosts accusation. Within all of this chaos, hamlet mistakenly kills Polonius and leaves for France. This causes Ophelia to.


. middle of paper.


. looked more modern, and the soldiers carried rifles that weren’t made at the time. Franco Zeffirelli brought out the classical hamlet, with castles, swords and the proper attire for that period. Nevertheless Kenneth Branagh brought the modern Hamlet, with modern weapons, trains and using a mansion instead of a castle.
The differences between the movie and were not big enough to distract from the power and meaning of the story. Even though there are a few differences, the movie and the play are telling the same story. All in all, the movie was an excellent depiction of Shakespeare’s Hamlet.


Works Cited
McCarthy, Todd. "Hamlet." Variety. 6 Dec. 1996. Web. 15 Jan. 2010.
.
"Zeffirelli's Hamlet for Today." 123HelpMe.com. 15 Jan 2010
.

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Реферат: Hamlet Branagh Vs Gibson Essay Research Paper

Hamlet Branagh Vs Gibson Essay Research Paper

I am not a big fan of the 1990 movie version of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, starring Mel Gibson. I feel that while it stands alone as a very well made movie and contains great acting performances throughout, I think that it strays too far from the original text and layout of the play. The omissions and transposing makes the play weaker, and while it is a great screenplay, it fails in comparison to Shakespeare’s original work.

The three things which bother me the most are the omission of Fortinbras and the handling of the, “To be or not to be…” soliloquy and the “Get thee to a nunnery…” scene, and Hamlet’s Oedipus complex.

Omitting the subplot of Fortinbras took away the whole political aspect of the piece. It also weakened the ending. I understand that director Franco Zeffirelli wanted to keep the movie at a reasonable length, but I feel that his omissions took away a lot of the power of the original version. Maybe I am just a purist, but I much prefer the 1996 Kenneth Branagh version, even if some of the acting was weaker in it. But I would rather sit through four hours and see the whole play than sit through two and half and see a butchering of the text. I did not like that some of the long speeches were cut down and that some character said lines written for others.

I absolutely love the writing that takes us from the most famous speech ever written to the scene between Hamlet and Ophelia. The intensity of the “To be or not to be…” soliloquy into the “Get thee to a nunnery…” scene is my favorite transition ever written and I think they totally blew it in this film. I felt they through away the Hamlet/Ophelia scene and turned something beautiful into something boring. The only thing that makes it work is the great acting performances of Mel Gibson and Helena-Bonham Carter. Carter is superb as Ophelia, much better than Kate Winslet, who was great in the Branagh version. I was pleasantly shocked at the performance, especially the scene where goes insane after finding out her father is dead.

That is something else that greatly bothers me. I don’t like the way Gibson was directed to play the scene in which he kills Polonius. He doesn’t even play it like he cares that he did it. That also makes Hamlet seem like a man who does not have a mind. I read somewhere once that Gibson felt the same thing about the scene. Ian Holm gives a very fine performance as Polonius. Alan Bates also shines as Claudius. He gives such a fine performance in the role.

I am not a big fan of Glenn Close, but she was wonderful as Queen Gertrude. I just don’t agree with Oedipus story line. I don’t feel that the original text calls for it to be so played out. Shakespeare hints at incestual activities in a lot of his plays, including between Tybalt and his aunt in Romeo & Juliet. But I don’t feel it should be taken so literally. It made Hamlet seem as though he really was completely insane. That, to me, keeps the whole play from working. But again, as a movie, it works.

Mel Gibson gives a very fine performance as the tragic hero. The only times which he falters, it is due to the directing and re-writing by Zeffirelli. Gibson gives a much more true-to-life and honest performance than say Branagh or even Olivier did. He did a truly amazing job. Nathaniel Parker and Stephen Dillane did nicely as Laertes and Horatio. I would have liked to see more from the grave-digger scene. It didn’t have the comic relief that Billy Crystal’s performance in the Branagh version possessed.

Considering all the problems I have with it, the movie itself is spectacular. I have a very biased opinion, being that I know the script so well. Speaking of it as a screenplay and film, it is extremely well done. Zefferelli brings a flow of reality to the story and turns it into a fine film. The casting was perfect for his version and one scene in particular was great, the scene with Hamlet and Ophelia in the courtyard. I like that scene a lot. Gibson and Bonham-Carter are wonderful. I would just prefer to see the true version, over an adapted version. That is just my opinion.

Mel Gibson vs

Mel Gibson vs. Kenneth Branaugh as Hamlet

Mel Gibson vs. Kenneth Branaugh as Hamlet

First in an installment looking at the modern film versions of Shakespeare's plays

by Lynn Davison Jr. Contributing Writer

The recent "box office rebirth" of England's favorite bard has left Hollywood with much to do about interpreting Shakespeare's classic dramas. The characters of Ophelia, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, the gravedigger, and of course Hamlet himself take new life, as the greatest actors of our time assume these timeless roles.

Produced in 1990, Mel Gibson's "Hamlet" is a more straightforward, highly edited version of the original text in comparison to Kenneth Brannagh's lavish rendition of the same tale. At only 135 minutes, Gibson's "Hamlet" might be considered "Shakespeare Light," the cinematic equivalent of Cliff's Notes. However, although Brannagh should be commended for sticking to the text, be forewarned about this "Hamlet"-by including every line of the original play, this movie clocks in at exactly 242 minutes.

The setting chosen for Brannagh's and Gibson's "Elsinore Castle" are as different as day and night, quite literally. And these bright and dark castle settings symbolically reinforce the specific "mood" or themes each director emphasizes.

For instance, the lugubrious Gibson feels perfectly at home in his dark and dank mansion, an ideal place for a grieving soul to maintain its ruefull descent. Conversely, the introspective Brannagh is continuously catching glimpses of himself and others (and into their true souls) in the mirror-lined ballrooms of his glistening castle.

Since Hamlet is, in its essence, truly a ghost story (so apropos for Halloween week!), each director has handled these "special effects" quite differently. Gibson gives a more stage-like handling of the ghost of Hamlet's father, using only lighting to cast an eerie glow or flickering shadows on its actors. Brannagh, on the other hand, seeks to use every filmmaker's.

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Реферат: Hamlet Branagh Vs Gibson Essay Research Paper

Hamlet: Branagh Vs Gibson Essay, Research Paper

I am not a big fan of the 1990 movie version of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, starring Mel Gibson. I feel that while it stands alone as a very well made movie and contains great acting performances throughout, I think that it strays too far from the original text and layout of the play. The omissions and transposing makes the play weaker, and while it is a great screenplay, it fails in comparison to Shakespeare’s original work.

The three things which bother me the most are the omission of Fortinbras and the handling of the, “To be or not to be…” soliloquy and the “Get thee to a nunnery…” scene, and Hamlet’s Oedipus complex.

Omitting the subplot of Fortinbras took away the whole political aspect of the piece. It also weakened the ending. I understand that director Franco Zeffirelli wanted to keep the movie at a reasonable length, but I feel that his omissions took away a lot of the power of the original version. Maybe I am just a purist, but I much prefer the 1996 Kenneth Branagh version, even if some of the acting was weaker in it. But I would rather sit through four hours and see the whole play than sit through two and half and see a butchering of the text. I did not like that some of the long speeches were cut down and that some character said lines written for others.

I absolutely love the writing that takes us from the most famous speech ever written to the scene between Hamlet and Ophelia. The intensity of the “To be or not to be…” soliloquy into the “Get thee to a nunnery…” scene is my favorite transition ever written and I think they totally blew it in this film. I felt they through away the Hamlet/Ophelia scene and turned something beautiful into something boring. The only thing that makes it work is the great acting performances of Mel Gibson and Helena-Bonham Carter. Carter is superb as Ophelia, much better than Kate Winslet, who was great in the Branagh version. I was pleasantly shocked at the performance, especially the scene where goes insane after finding out her father is dead.

That is something else that greatly bothers me. I don’t like the way Gibson was directed to play the scene in which he kills Polonius. He doesn’t even play it like he cares that he did it. That also makes Hamlet seem like a man who does not have a mind. I read somewhere once that Gibson felt the same thing about the scene. Ian Holm gives a very fine performance as Polonius. Alan Bates also shines as Claudius. He gives such a fine performance in the role.

I am not a big fan of Glenn Close, but she was wonderful as Queen Gertrude. I just don’t agree with Oedipus story line. I don’t feel that the original text calls for it to be so played out. Shakespeare hints at incestual activities in a lot of his plays, including between Tybalt and his aunt in Romeo & Juliet. But I don’t feel it should be taken so literally. It made Hamlet seem as though he really was completely insane. That, to me, keeps the whole play from working. But again, as a movie, it works.

Mel Gibson gives a very fine performance as the tragic hero. The only times which he falters, it is due to the directing and re-writing by Zeffirelli. Gibson gives a much more true-to-life and honest performance than say Branagh or even Olivier did. He did a truly amazing job. Nathaniel Parker and Stephen Dillane did nicely as Laertes and Horatio. I would have liked to see more from the grave-digger scene. It didn’t have the comic relief that Billy Crystal’s performance in the Branagh version possessed.

Considering all the problems I have with it, the movie itself is spectacular. I have a very biased opinion, being that I know the script so well. Speaking of it as a screenplay and film, it is extremely well done. Zefferelli brings a flow of reality to the story and turns it into a fine film. The casting was perfect for his version and one scene in particular was great, the scene with Hamlet and Ophelia in the courtyard. I like that scene a lot. Gibson and Bonham-Carter are wonderful. I would just prefer to see the true version, over an adapted version. That is just my opinion.