Homework for you

The Others Alejandro Amenabar Essay Scholarships

Category: Essay

Description

Alejandro Amenábar

Alejandro Amenábar

Alejandro Fernando Amenábar Cantos. commonly known as Alejandro Amenábar (born March 31, 1972), is a Spanish film director, screenwriter and composer. Among other honors, he has won 9 Goyas, two European Film Award and an Oscar. He has written or co-written the screenplays to all six of his movies and composed almost all of the soundtracks.

Early life

Amenábar is the son of a Chilean man, Hugo Ricardo Amenábar and a Spanish woman, Josefina Cantos. He has a dual Chilean-Spanish citizenship. His father worked as a technician at General Electric, while his mother, Josefina, decided to stay at home and take care of the children. Alejandro is the younger of two brothers; his older brother, Ricardo, was born December 4, 1969.

Alejandro's mother Josefina's older sister had moved to the capital of Chile, Santiago, and she invited Josefina to join her there. In Santiago, Josefina met Hugo, Alejandro's father. Alejandro was born on March 31, 1972.

In August 1973, Alejandro was only one year old when his family moved to Spain. The family settled in Madrid, initially living in a camping caravan. When Alejandro was six years old, they moved to a complex on the outskirts of the town of Paracuellos del Jarama (Madrid ).

Alejandro and his brother did not watch much television. From the age of 15, Alejandro would dedicate his time to going to the cinema to watch movies. Other than theater, his other passions were writing stories and reading books. According to Alejandro’s mother, Alejandro had the capacity to absorb everything he read. As a child, he also composed melodies with the keyboard and guitar with the same ease as when he wrote his stories.

Alejandro started his studies at the Padres Escolapios de Getafe school. In his second year of high school, he transferred to the Alameda de Osuna institute, in the north-east of Madrid. The school was not close to where Alejandro was living; however, his parents, who were very concerned about his education, decided to enroll him in that institute because it was known as one of the best schools in Madrid.

Before he became a director, Alejandro worked as a stock boy in a warehouse and as a gardener, until he had enough money to buy his own home camera. He did not want to start his university studies in cinema before ever having touched a camera. Amenábar entered the Information Sciences Faculty at Madrid's Complutense University. where after numerous scholastic failures he decided to give up studying cinema and he began directing. The advantage from having attended University previously was that he met people who later in life would become very important throughout his career (that was the case for Sergio Rozas and Carlos Montero. through whom he met Eduardo Noriega ). At university, he also met Mateo Gil. a friend and companion, and the pair made a pact to always support each other's projects.

Film career

Between 1991 and 1994, Amenábar made three short films which in a very significant way influenced his first full-length films: La Cabeza. Himenóptero. and Luna .

Knowing José Luis Cuerda helped Alejandro greatly in his career. A friend of José Luis Cuerda gave him the script of Himenóptero so he would give his opinion. Thereafter, Cuerda was interested in Alejandro’s work. This led to him becoming the producer of Thesis (1996), which is one of Alejandro’s most recognized films, putting his name on the map. Thesis was a thriller set in the School of Information Sciences at the Complutense University of Madrid. Through this film, he gained the attention of critics in the Berlin Film Festival and won seven Goyas, including Best Picture and Best New Director.

In 1997 Alejandro made Abre Los Ojos . a science fiction movie that had notable success at international festivals such as Berlin and Tokyo. Impressed by the movie, Tom Cruise bought the rights to adapt and produce the film, starring in a remake, Vanilla Sky .

His third large film was The Others . starring Nicole Kidman. It was very successful at an international level, especially in Spain, where it was the most viewed film that year. The Others was also very popular in the United States, where it was at the top of the box office for several weeks. The film premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2001, won 8 Goyas, including the Best Picture and Best Director, and was nominated for best European Film Movie.

In 2004 Amenábar released The Sea Inside . a real life-story about a quadriplegic Ramón Sampedro (played by Javier Bardem ), which addressed issues such as euthanasia, abortion, or “the right to a dignified life.” The movie won 14 Goyas, including best movie and best director, and an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2004.

In 2008 Amenábar released his next film, called Mists of Time ; however he later changed the name to Agora . The film starred big-name actors including Rachel Weisz and Max Minghella. Agora premiered on October 9, 2009, and with a budget of 50 million euros, it is the most expensive Spanish film in history. [ citation needed ]

Amenábar is also the composer of the soundtrack of his films, as well as others, such as Butterfly's Tongue directed by José Luis Cuerda and Nobody Knows Anybody directed by Mateo Gil.

Amenábar was reported to be working on a new film titled Regression and starring Ethan Hawke and Emma Watson. which is set by a release over TWC-Dimension in the United States. [ 1 ]

Personal life

In 2004, Amenábar came out as gay. [ 2 ] On 18 July 2015, he married David Blanco. [ 3 ]

Filmography

Other articles

Alejandro Amen - bar Explained

Alejandro Amenábar Explained

Alejandro Fernando Amenábar Cantos. commonly known as Alejandro Amenábar (born March 31, 1972), is a Spanish film director, screenwriter and composer. Among other honors, he has won nine Goyas, two European Film Award and an Oscar. He has written or co-written the screenplays to all six of his movies and composed almost all of the soundtracks.

Early life

Amenábar is the son of a Chilean man, Hugo Ricardo Amenábar and a Spanish woman, Josefina Cantos. He has a dual Chilean-Spanish citizenship. His father worked as a technician at General Electric, while his mother, Josefina, decided to stay at home and take care of the children. Alejandro is the younger of two brothers; his older brother, Ricardo, was born December 4, 1969.

Alejandro's mother Josefina's older sister had moved to the capital of Chile, Santiago, and she invited Josefina to join her there. In Santiago, Josefina met Hugo, Alejandro's father. Alejandro was born on March 31, 1972.

In August 1973, Alejandro was only one year old when his family moved to Spain. The family settled in Madrid, living in a camping caravan. When Alejandro was six years old, they moved to a complex on the outskirts of the town of Paracuellos de Jarama (Madrid ).

Alejandro and his brother did not watch much television. From the age of 15, Alejandro would dedicate his time to going to the cinema to watch movies. Other than theater, his passions were writing stories and reading books. According to Alejandro’s mother, Alejandro had the capacity to absorb everything he read. As a child, he also composed melodies with the keyboard and guitar with the same ease as when he wrote his stories.

Alejandro started his studies at the Padres Escolapios de Getafe school. In his second year of high school, he transferred to the Alameda de Osuna institute, in the north-east of Madrid. The school was not close to where Alejandro was living; however, his parents, who were very concerned about his education, decided to enroll him in that institute because it was known as one of the best schools in Madrid.

Before he became a director, Alejandro worked as a stock boy in a warehouse and as a gardener, until he had enough money to buy his own home camera. He did not want to start his university studies in cinema before ever having touched a camera. Amenábar entered the Information Sciences Faculty at Madrid's Complutense University. where after numerous scholastic failures he decided to give up studying cinema and he began directing. The advantage from having attended university was that he met people who later in life would become very important throughout his career (that was the case for Sergio Rozas and Carlos Montero. through whom he met Eduardo Noriega ). At university, he also met Mateo Gil. a friend and companion, and the pair made a pact to always support each other's projects.

Film career

Between 1991 and 1994, Amenábar made three short films which in a very significant way influenced his first full-length films: La Cabeza. Himenóptero. and Luna .

Knowing José Luis Cuerda helped Alejandro greatly in his career. A friend of José Luis Cuerda gave him the script of Himenóptero so he would give his opinion. Thereafter, Cuerda was interested in Amenábar’s work. This led to him becoming the producer of Thesis (1996), which is one of Amenábar’s most recognized films, putting his name on the map. Thesis was a thriller set in the School of Information Sciences at the Complutense University of Madrid. Through this film, he gained the attention of critics in the Berlin Film Festival and won seven Goyas, including Best Picture and Best New Director.

In 1997 he made Abre Los Ojos . a science fiction movie that had notable success at international festivals such as Berlin and Tokyo. Impressed by the movie, Tom Cruise bought the rights to adapt and produce the film, starring in a remake, Vanilla Sky .

His third large film was The Others . a ghost story starring Nicole Kidman. It was very successful at an international level, especially in Spain, where it was the most viewed film that year. The Others was also very popular in the United States, where it was at the top of the box office for several weeks. The film premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2001, won eight Goyas, including the Best Picture and Best Director, and was nominated for best European Film Movie.

In 2004 Amenábar released The Sea Inside . a real life-story about a quadriplegic Ramón Sampedro (played by Javier Bardem ), which addressed issues such as euthanasia, abortion, or “the right to a dignified life.” The movie won 14 Goyas, including best movie and best director, and an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2004.

In 2008 Amenábar released his next film, called Mists of Time ; however he later changed the name to Agora . The film starred big-name actors including Rachel Weisz and Max Minghella. Agora premiered on October 9, 2009, and with a budget of 50 million euros, it is the most expensive Spanish film in history.

After a hiatus of almost seven years, Amenábar came back in 2015 with a new movie titled Regression . a thriller starring Ethan Hawke and Emma Watson. The film had its world premiere at the San Sebastián International Film Festival in September 2015. Initial reviews were lukewarm. [1]

Amenábar is also the composer of the soundtrack of his films, as well as others, such as Butterfly's Tongue directed by José Luis Cuerda and Nobody Knows Anybody directed by Mateo Gil.

Personal life

In 2004, Amenábar came out as gay. [2] On 18 July 2015, he married David Blanco. [3]

Filmography Full length films Other works
  • Al Lado del Atlas (1994) [Composer]
  • Allanamiento de Morada (1998) [Composer]
  • La lengua de las mariposas (1999) [Composer]
  • Nadie conoce a Nadie (1999) [Composer]
  • El Soñador (2004) [Writer and producer]
  • Un viaje mar adentro (television feature) (2005) [Director]
External links Notes and References

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Alejandro Amenábar ".

Except where otherwise indicated, Everything.Explained.Today is © Copyright 2009-2016, A B Cryer, All Rights Reserved. Cookie policy .

Alejandro Amenabar

Alejandro Amenabar

The Sea Inside has Spanish filmmaker Alejandro Amenábar's (Open Your Eyes) auteuristic grip all over it. Besides directing, Amenábar also co-produced, co-wrote (with longtime collaborator, Mateo Gil), scored and edited this saga about a true-life quadriplegic who campaigned for 30 years against Spain's judiciary for the right to end his life. Paralyzed after a diving accident, Ramón Sampedro (Javier Bardem) is reduced to lying supine in a room of his older brother José's farmhouse. Day and night, year after year, Ramón is vigilantly cared for by José (Celso Bugallo), and his small clan. The slow grind of Ramón 's existence, salved only by his family's devotion, eventually wears the patient down to where he feels euthanasia is the only dignified option left.

Ramón's outspokenness wins the interest -- and the affections -- of a pair of women: Julia (Belén Rueda), the terminally ill lawyer who helps Ramón build his case, and Rosa (Lola Dueñas), a single mother drawn to Ramón out of loneliness and her admiration for his strength. But while the sensuous Julia, herself coping with illness, fully sympathizes with Ramón 's cause, the feisty Rosa sulks and frets whenever Ramón so much as breathes a word of his intentions.

The Others has a great ending -- one that will be spoofed in Scary Movie 4 and referred to in Entertainment Weekly for years to come. It's the reason why people will rush to the theater this summer, spurred on by the word of mouth from friends and co-workers.

What people will forget to tell you is that there's more than 90 minutes of an OK horror movie to watch before a glorious 10 minutes. Take away the ending--which ties the script's agnostic themes together too perfectly--and you get The Haunting, just with superior acting and production values.

If Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch had collaborated on a project, the result might have been something like Open Your Eyes. Kubrick's most common themes -- imaginary worlds, sexual and social obsessions, distrust of emotion, human depravity, and a journey towards freedom and self-knowledge -- present themselves here. Lynch's usual themes -- dreams and illusion vs. reality, persuasion, fear, self-submission, murder, and curiosity -- also sprinkle themselves into this movie's stirring, complex recipe.

From the moment the movie opens, it's unclear of what is real and what is not. We meet a handsome, young, successful businessman named César (Eduardo Noriega), who drives expensive cars, resides in a classy residence, and enjoys an endless supply of beautiful women.

Alejandro Amenabar Quick Links Contactmusic 2017 Exclusive

Alejandro Amenabar Movies

Ambitious in scope, this film feels over-serious and oddly cold. Fans of historical dramas may.

Set in Alexandria in 391 A.D. Agora tells the story of the astronomer-philosopher Hypatia. Knowing.

The Sea Inside has Spanish filmmaker Alejandro Amenábar's (Open Your Eyes) auteuristic grip all over.

Alejandro Amen - bar - Gpedia, Your Encyclopedia

Alejandro Amenábar

David Blanco (m. 2015)

Alejandro Fernando Amenábar Cantos. commonly known as Alejandro Amenábar (born March 31, 1972), is a Spanish film director, screenwriter and composer. Among other honors, he has won nine Goyas, two European Film Award and an Oscar. He has written or co-written the screenplays to all six of his movies and composed almost all of the soundtracks.

Amenábar is the son of a Chilean man, Hugo Ricardo Amenabar and a Spanish woman, Josefina Cantos. He has a dual Chilean-Spanish citizenship. His father worked as a technician at General Electric, while his mother decided to stay at home and take care of the children. Alejandro is the younger of two brothers; his older brother, Ricardo, was born December 4, 1969.

Josefina's older sister had moved to the capital of Chile, Santiago, and she invited Josefina to join her there. In Santiago, Josefina met Hugo. Alejandro was born on March 31, 1972.

In August 1973, his family moved to Spain. The family settled in Madrid, living in a camping caravan. When Alejandro was six years old, they moved to a complex on the outskirts of the town of Paracuellos de Jarama (Madrid ).

Alejandro and his brother did not watch much television. From the age of 15, Alejandro would dedicate his time to going to the cinema to watch movies. Other than theater, his passions were writing stories and reading books. According to Alejandro’s mother, Alejandro had the capacity to absorb everything he read. As a child, he also composed melodies with the keyboard and guitar with the same ease as when he wrote his stories.

Alejandro started his studies at the Padres Escolapios de Getafe school. In his second year of high school, he transferred to the Alameda de Osuna institute, in the north-east of Madrid. The school was not close to where Alejandro was living; however, his parents, who were very concerned about his education, decided to enroll him in that institute because it was known as one of the best schools in Madrid.

Before he became a director, Alejandro worked as a stock boy in a warehouse and as a gardener, until he had enough money to buy his own home camera. He did not want to start his university studies in cinema before ever having touched a camera. Amenábar entered the Information Sciences Faculty at Madrid's Complutense University. where after numerous scholastic failures he decided to give up studying cinema and he began directing. The advantage from having attended university was that he met people who later in life would become very important throughout his career (that was the case for Sergio Rozas and Carlos Montero. through whom he met Eduardo Noriega ). At university, he also met Mateo Gil. a friend and companion, and the pair made a pact to always support each other's projects.

Between 1991 and 1994, Amenábar made three short films which in a very significant way influenced his first full-length films: La Cabeza . Himenóptero . and Luna .

Knowing José Luis Cuerda helped Alejandro greatly in his career. A friend of José Luis Cuerda gave him the script of Himenóptero so he would give his opinion. Thereafter, Cuerda was interested in Amenábar’s work. This led to him becoming the producer of Thesis (1996), which is one of Amenábar’s most recognized films, putting his name on the map. Thesis was a thriller set in the School of Information Sciences at the Complutense University of Madrid. Through this film, he gained the attention of critics in the Berlin Film Festival and won seven Goyas, including Best Picture and Best New Director.

In 1997 he made Abre Los Ojos . a science fiction movie that had notable success at international festivals such as Berlin and Tokyo. Impressed by the movie, Tom Cruise bought the rights to adapt and produce the film, starring in a remake, Vanilla Sky .

His third large film was The Others . a ghost story starring Nicole Kidman. It was very successful at an international level, especially in Spain, where it was the most viewed film that year. The Others was also very popular in the United States, where it was at the top of the box office for several weeks. The film premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2001, won eight Goyas, including the Best Picture and Best Director, and was nominated for best European Film Movie.

In 2004 Amenábar released The Sea Inside . a real life-story about a quadriplegic Ramón Sampedro (played by Javier Bardem ), which addressed issues such as euthanasia, abortion, or “the right to a dignified life.” The movie won 14 Goyas, including best movie and best director, and an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2004.

In 2008 Amenábar released his next film, called Mists of Time ; however he later changed the name to Agora . The film starred big-name actors including Rachel Weisz and Max Minghella. Agora premiered on October 9, 2009, and with a budget of 50 million euros, it is the most expensive Spanish film in history. [ citation needed ]

After a hiatus of almost seven years, Amenábar came back in 2015 with a new movie titled Regression . a thriller starring Ethan Hawke and Emma Watson. The film had its world premiere at the San Sebastián International Film Festival in September 2015. Initial reviews were lukewarm. [1]

Amenábar is also the composer of the soundtrack of his films, as well as others, such as Butterfly's Tongue directed by José Luis Cuerda and Nobody Knows Anybody directed by Mateo Gil.

In 2004, Amenábar came out as gay. [2] On 18 July 2015, he married David Blanco. [3]

The Others (Alejandro Amenábar, 2001)

As it is hard to truly discuss The Others without spoilers, this entry consists both of a spoiler-free review and an analytical essay that contains spoilers.

The score is overused to the point of even being funny, the twist is predictable in spite of also being overused, many plot points are also overused and predictable, and Chekhov has a metaphorical gun that does not go off (and a literal one that does). There are lots of reasons that The Others (2001), my first experience with Alejandro Amenábar, should have been an uncomfortable one. And yet, there was something oddly provocative about the film—at least for a good portion of it.

Nicole Kidman, who plays Grace, a mother waiting for her husband to return from a finished while raising her two children who are allergic to light, gives a flawed but utterly believable performance. She convinces us that she is an unfortunate victim caught up in a psychological trauma, but she also lets on very early that something is not quite right, well before we (or she) know. There’s a virtue in the vice, however, as it puts the psychological horror on us. Amenábar displays a gift for mood, made doubly effective by pitch-perfect lighting and splendid, Victorian sets (the story takes place in the 1940s, but the house pre-dates the 20 th century) in every room of the giant mansion. When The Others is pulling strings that make us wonder “is something up here? Is the child crazy, or is the mother?” it is hard not to enjoy, even though it relies almost too much on cliché—the child who knows, the maids who we know are more knowledgeable than they let on, footsteps and voices, etc.

It is thus unfortunate that right when the film reaches its pitch-perfect mood, the gag is up. The Others transitions from a psychological horror to a mystery, one which most audiences will solve long before Grace, thanks to the heavy foreshadowing. As a result, Grace’s sludgy game of catch-up is mostly uninteresting. It is during this second act that the score (by Amenábar himself) is overused. Cheesiness turns suspense into silliness, and it becomes far more rewarding to focus on the always-impressive look of the film. Luckily, Kidman, who descends into impatience and then into fear and finally into madness, finds a way to hold our attention, at least until the conclusion. Still, it’s hard not to dwell on the moments that hint at greatness but never come through.

Essay (contains spoilers):

While the twist, that the family and the maids are dead and the “intruders” are the actual residents, is predictable, there is nonetheless a level of intrigue that it raises that outclasses The Sixth Sense. That said, The Others very firmly wants to ensure that the twist does not come out of nowhere: Alluding to the end, we are told repeatedly that “The death of a loved one can lead people to do the strangest things,” and that it has been “a week” since a lot of strange occurrences (the heavy fog set in, the birds stopped singing, the postman’s last visit). We can thus infer that the family has been dead for one week. We also have one scene of each child “breathing heavily” and several references to Grace’s migraines, symbolic indicators of their deaths (being smothered and a self-inflicted gunshot to the head, respectively).

That there is an excess of dialogue that gives away the ending is unfortunate, but predictability should does not ruin a movie, lest we would have no reason to ever watch something twice. The biggest problem with The Others is that it chooses to be a mind-bending mystery instead of a unique coming-of-age story (one that would pre-date The Lovely Bones by quite some time). There is the obvious message about not keeping your children “in the dark,” as is seen in the literal condition of the children, who will die with prolonged exposure to light. Ironically, it is not until the children learn that they are already dead that they are literally brought into the light. This should have been the tip of the iceberg, but The Others puts such little emphasis on the children (especially Nicholas) in comparison to Grace that it is the extent of the complexity. With constant readings and questionings of Biblical passages, including a hand-drawn sequence that accompanies one such passage that opens the film, there are means of exploring the children’s understanding of life, death and afterlife.

Early in the film, Grace and her children have a conversation about “the four levels of hell.” They linger on “children’s limbo,” a place they would go if they lied to the extent of denying Christ. Shortly thereafter, Grace gives Nicholas a rosary, telling him to squeeze it when he is afraid. This rosary never comes back in the film (it is the un-fired gun I spoke of in my review), despite its explicit purpose being a sufficient way of Nicholas coming to terms with the fact that he is dead. It is suggested that the children are in that level of hell, but Grace simply replies “I don’t know if it exists.” This idea runs against her devoutly Catholic ways throughout the film, but it also downplays a theme that could have been quite effective if it were further explored.

Along with Grace and the children, we know Grace’s husband is dead because he is able to interact with the family. His stay in the film is brief, existing mostly to hint at “that horrible day” where Grace smothered their children (probably the most obvious clue in the film). Still, his place in the film suggests that he is in the same after-life—if there is one—that Grace and the children are. This harkens back to an answer Grace gives at dinner, stating that the good guys in a war go to heaven but the bad guys don’t. Because the house is in Britain, we can safely assume that he fought against the Nazis, yet he ends up in some level of hell anyway. It is highly unlikely that Alejandro Amenábar is advocating Nazi sympathy, especially considering that all other mentions of the war are for more respectable. Instead, it leaves a question about interaction between levels of hell. Grace states that hell is located in the center of the earth, where it is “very, very hot.” Because this does not show up on screen, and because a casualty of war, a mother who killed her children, and their children would all end up in the same circle is unlikely, The Others can be interpreted to reject Biblical ideas of afterlife. Given all the Catholic imagery and spiritual reverence, this is also highly unlikely.

Another, more likely interpretation is that the characters are in purgatory. Even this interpretation, however, falls flat with the very end of the film, where Grace declares that she and her children will never leave the house, but will instead learn to coexist with the living.

With this far more agreeable, more easily supported hypothesis, The Others once again is perfectly positioned to become a tale of the dead, especially the children, coming to terms with their new position in the world. But The Others does not go down this path, suggesting the easier message that the dead are always with us, failing to do any genuine exploring in favor of a more commercial ghost story. The rosary never comes back, the biblical passages are mostly empty, and the husband exists to foreshadow rather than to symbolize. Like the characters throughout the film, we are mostly in the dark, but in the end we do not glimpse the light with them. The Others. for what it is, is not a bad film. Unfortunately, there are hints of a great film that are abandoned for an entertaining film.