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Accumulate Definition Example Essays

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Accumulate Synonyms, Accumulate Antonyms

accumulate Example Sentences for accumulate

Interest was allowed to accumulate. until the whole debt amounted to the sum of a thousand dollars.

Then you began to take part in local politics and to accumulate ambitions.

Thus Buddhists accumulate religious "merit" 166 not only by fasting and praying, but by making collections of jewels and symbols.

Aye; accumulate a store of our own ready for the day we want them?

From time to time it cleans out the dirt and rubbish which accumulate in the hole.

Folks work to get a living, and then to accumulate property.

We all like to accumulate. to believe that we are fortune's favourite.

Dust was not allowed to accumulate on the Bibles of Madagascar in those days!

Allow no metal dust or gritty substances to accumulate at the insulation of exposed parts.

It would be easy as well as instructive to accumulate examples.

Other articles

Accumulate verb - Definition, pictures, pronunciation and usage notes

; NAmE NAmE / / əˈkjuːmjəleɪtɪŋ / /

  • 1 [ transitive ] accumulate something to gradually get more and more of something over a period of time synonym amass I seem to have accumulated a lot of books. By investing wisely she accumulated a fortune. We have accumulated a great amount of evidence. Synonyms collect gather accumulate amass These words all mean to get more of something over a period of time, or to increase in quantity over a period of time. collect to bring things or information together from different people or places; to gradually increase in amount in a place: We’ve been collecting data from various sources. Dirt had collected in the corners of the room. People sometimes collect things of a particular type as a hobby: to collect stamps. gather to bring things together that have been spread around; to collect information from different sources: I waited while he gathered up his papers. Detectives have spent months gathering evidence. collect or gather? Both collect and gather can be used in the same way to talk about bringing together data, information or evidence. When talking about things, gather is used with words like things. belongings or papers when the things are spread around within a short distance. Collect is used for getting examples of something from different people or places that are physically separated. accumulate ( rather formal ) to gradually get more and more of something over a period of time; to gradually increase in number or quantity over a period of time: I seem to have accumulated a lot of books. Debts began to accumulate. amass ( rather formal ) to collect something in large quantities, especially money, debts or information: He amassed a fortune from silver mining. Patterns to collect/​gather/​accumulate/​amass data/​evidence/​information to accumulate/​amass a fortune/​debts dirt/​dust/​debris collects/​accumulates to gradually/​slowly collect/​gather/​accumulate (something)
  • 2 [ intransitive ] to gradually increase in number or quantity over a period of time synonym build up Debts began to accumulate. Dust and dirt soon accumulate if a house is not cleaned regularly. Synonyms collect gather accumulate amass These words all mean to get more of something over a period of time, or to increase in quantity over a period of time. collect to bring things or information together from different people or places; to gradually increase in amount in a place: We’ve been collecting data from various sources. Dirt had collected in the corners of the room. People sometimes collect things of a particular type as a hobby: to collect stamps. gather to bring things together that have been spread around; to collect information from different sources: I waited while he gathered up his papers. Detectives have spent months gathering evidence. collect or gather? Both collect and gather can be used in the same way to talk about bringing together data, information or evidence. When talking about things, gather is used with words like things. belongings or papers when the things are spread around within a short distance. Collect is used for getting examples of something from different people or places that are physically separated. accumulate ( rather formal ) to gradually get more and more of something over a period of time; to gradually increase in number or quantity over a period of time: I seem to have accumulated a lot of books. Debts began to accumulate. amass ( rather formal ) to collect something in large quantities, especially money, debts or information: He amassed a fortune from silver mining. Patterns to collect/​gather/​accumulate/​amass data/​evidence/​information to accumulate/​amass a fortune/​debts dirt/​dust/​debris collects/​accumulates to gradually/​slowly collect/​gather/​accumulate (something) Word Origin late 15th cent. from Latin accumulat-

    from the verb accumulare. from ad-

    Extra examples Children gradually accumulate knowledge as they grow up. Dirt must not be allowed to accumulate. Evidence began to accumulate, suggesting that the drug had harmful side-effects. Toxic chemicals tend to accumulate in the body. seas and lakes where sedimentary deposits are slowly accumulating the wealth he had accumulated over the years

  • See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: accumulate

    Accumulate Meaning and Example Sentence: Meaning, definition, sample sentence of Accumulate

    Accumulate

    Double click on any word to get a popup explanation of the word and sample sentencesDictionary | Wikipedia | Synonyms | Quotation | News

    Accumulate Meaning and Definition in Dictionary Definitions from Wordnet 2.0
    • collect or gather; "Journals are accumulating in my office"; "The work keeps piling up"
    • get or gather together; "I am accumulating evidence for the man''s unfaithfulness to his wife"; "She is amassing a lot of data for her thesis"; "She rolled up a small fortune"

    Would you like to add your own explaination to this word 'Accumulate' ?
    Wikipedia Meaning and Definition on 'Accumulate'
    • Repeat-accumulate code: In computer science, repeat- accumulate codes (RA codes) are a low complexity class of error-correcting codes. They were devised so that their ensemble
    • Multiply–accumulate operation: In computing, especially digital signal processing, the multiply– accumulate operation is a common step that computes the product of two numbers and adds
    • Accumulated cyclone energy: Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) is a measure used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to express the activity of individual
    • Accumulated Campaign Service Medal: The Accumulated Campaign Service Medal and the Accumulated Campaign Service Medal 2011 are medals awarded by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to members
    • Accumulated other comprehensive income: to retained earnings each period they accumulate as shareholder equity items and thus are entitled “ Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income” and is sometimes
    • Accumulated thermal unit: An accumulated thermal unit is a unit of measurement used to describe the cumulative effect of temperature over time. 1 ATU is equal to 1 degree Celsius
    Words and phrases related to 'Accumulate'

    Accumulation Examples and Definition - Literary Devices

    Popular Literary Devices Accumulation Definition of Accumulation

    Accumulation is a figure of speech in rhetoric that creates a list or gathers scattered ideas in a way that builds up, emphasizes, or summarizes the main point. Accumulation is an example of addition in rhetoric, using a “more the merrier” approach to illustrating the theme of a passage. Addition in rhetoric is also known as adiectio. while the definition of accumulation is the same as that of congeries and accumulatio. Accumulation is part of a group of figures of speech in rhetoric called enumeratio. Note that accumulation often has some repetition included, especially anaphora in which a word is repeated at the beginning of successive clauses or sentences. However, to qualify as accumulation the repetition must have a sense of adding on to a list and not simply repeating the same thing over and over.

    The word accumulation comes from the Latin word for “to amass.”

    Common Examples of Accumulation

    There are many famous examples of accumulation in speeches, songs, interviews, advertisements, and so on. Here are some examples of accumulation, both famous and more obscure:

    I’ve been to:
    Boston, Charleston, Dayton, Louisiana,
    Washington, Houston, Kingston, Texarkana,
    Monterey, Faraday, Santa Fe, Tallapoosa,
    Glen Rock, Black Rock, Little Rock, Oskaloosa,
    Tennessee to Tennesse Chicopee, Spirit Lake,
    Grand Lake, Devils Lake, Crater Lake, for Pete’s sake.

    —“I’ve Been Everywhere” by Johnny Cash

    St. Augustine founded it. Becket died for it. Chaucer wrote about it. Cromwell shot at it. Hitler bombed it. Time is destroying it. Will you save it?

    —Slogan for Canterbury Cathedral in England

    I guess to be an American writer means, uh, I have dined multiply at drive-thru windows and that I have no choice but to occasionally darken the inside of a shopping mall, and that I come from a country of former slave-owners…and it means, hmm, that I like artificial cheese food products, and it means that I conceive of nature as an expanse of space, and it means that I believe that spirituality is best experienced in landscapes emptied of human beings, and it means that I like to spin the dial on a television set, just can’t stop myself from spinning that dial, and it means that I only speak one language well…and it means that I look to Europe for a definition of the ‘high’ arts, and it means that I sometimes can’t tell the difference between ‘high’ and ‘low’ arts…and it means I can’t imagine anyone would disagree with all these American things.

    —Rick Moody interview in “The Paris Review”

    Significance of Accumulation in Literature

    Accumulation can be an effective rhetorical strategy to create a sense of momentum towards a climax or conclusion. Authors may use accumulation to summarize all that’s come up until a certain moment, or to almost overwhelm the reader by heaping on more and more information. Accumulation can be also used to illustrate the main idea by exploring its many different facets and clarifying it. Accumulation can be found in every type of literature, from ancient drama to literary novels to poetry both old and contemporary.

    Examples of Accumulation in Literature Example #1

    PRINCE HENRY: A tun of man is thy companion. Why dost thou converse with that trunk of humors, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that stuffed cloakbag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with the pudding in his belly, that reverend Vice, that gray iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in years?

    (Henry IV, Part 1 by William Shakespeare)

    William Shakespeare is famous for the eloquence and inventiveness of his writing, but this doesn’t only apply to his beautiful sonnets and tragic monologues. Shakespeare was just as clever with his invective and insults, as we can see in the above excerpt from Henry IV, Part 1. Prince Henry is criticizing Falstaff in a myriad of ways, using accumulation to express his ire and overwhelm Falstaff. This quote contains anaphora with Henry beginning each new insult with “that.”

    Example #2

    I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked,
    dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix,
    angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night,
    who poverty and tatters and hollow-eyed and high sat up smoking in the supernatural darkness of cold-water flats floating across the tops of cities contemplating jazz,
    who bared their brains to Heaven under the El and saw Mohammedan angels staggering on tenement roofs illuminated,
    who passed through universities with radiant cool eyes hallucinating Arkansas and Blake-light tragedy among the scholars of war,
    who were expelled from the academies for crazy & publishing obscene odes on the windows of the skull
    who cowered in unshaven rooms in underwear, burning their money in wastebaskets and listening to the Terror through the wall…

    (“Howl” by Allen Ginsberg)

    Allen Ginsberg’s poem “Howl” is one very long example of accumulation. The excerpt above begins part one of the poem, and the “sentence” that is starts does not end for almost one hundred lines (each line being quite long in itself). Each of the three parts of “Howl” contains very strong use of anaphora, which is to say that each line begins in the same way. Ginsberg wanted the poem to be very striking in its imagery and sound, and used the technique of accumulation and long lines to create a sense of breathlessness.

    Example #3

    And the places on her body have no names.
    And she is what’s immense about the night.
    And their clothes on the floor are arranged
    for forgetfulness.

    (“Dwelling” by Li-Young Lee)

    Li-Young Lee’s short poem “Dwelling” ends with the short stanza excerpted above, which contains the anaphora example of each line beginning with “and.” This is also an accumulation example that builds toward a sense of conclusion by offering three distinct yet collaborating views of intimacy.

    Example #4

    I went to sleep with gum in my mouth and now there’s gum in my hair and when I got out of bed this morning I tripped on the skateboard and by mistake I dropped my sweater in the sink while the water was running and I could tell it was going to be a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day.

    (Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst)

    Even the title of Judith Viorst’s book for children Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day is an example of accumulation. Alexander proves just how bad his day is going by showing all the problems that have already occurred before breakfast. This accumulation of frustrations is familiar to us all, when we think that the universe must be against us because nothing seems to be going right. This excerpt also proves that accumulation and other similar rhetorical devices are prevalent not just in famous literature, but also is appropriate for children’s stories. In fact, it is sometimes more common in children’s books just because the repetition and adding on of ideas makes the book more memorable for kids.

    Test Your Knowledge of Accumulation

    1. Which of the following statements is the best accumulation definition?
    A. Adding redundant statements until a reader is sick of the main idea.
    B. Subtracting important information so that the main idea is obscure.
    C. Amassing similar or dissimilar things in a list so as to provide a sort of climax.

    Answer to Question #1

    Essay about Accumulated Change vs

    Accumulated Change vs. Definite Integral

    Martyna Wiacek
    MTH 116 C- Applied Calculus
    11/6/2012

    Chapter 5 Writing Assignment

    There is a correlation between area, accumulated change, and the definite integral that we have focused on throughout Chapter 5 in Applied Calculus.
    When looking at one rate-of-change function, the accumulated change over an interval and the definite integral are equivalent, their values could be positive, negative or zero. However, the area could never be negative because area is always positive by definition. The accumulated change looks at the whole area of the function that is between the graph and the horizontal axis. For instance, if f (x) is a rate-of-change function the area between f (x) and the x-axis represents the accumulated change between x = a and x = b. However, the definite integral puts specific limits into the function and the area of a particular region can be determined. For example, if f (x) is a rate-of-change function it means that: is what you can consider the area. The accumulation of change in a certain function can be evaluated by using the area of the region between the rate-of-change curve and the horizontal axis.

    We also see a similar relationship between the rate-of-change graph and the accumulated graph that we saw in derivatives. A minimum in the accumulated graph is caused by the rate-of-change function crossing over from positive to negative. A maximum in the accumulated graph is a result of the rate-of-change function moving from negative to positive. When there is a maximum or minimum in the rate-of-change graph you get an inflection point in the accumulation graph as well. Also, we see that if the rate-of-change function is negative then the accumulated graph is negative and so the accumulation graph is decreasing. However, when the rate-of-change graph is increasing, it does not affect whether or not the accumulated graph is increasing or decreasing.

    There are several problems in our book that demonstrate this.

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