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Cheryl Strayed is the author of #1 New York Times bestseller. the New York Times bestseller. and the novel. Strayed has written the column on The Rumpus since March 2010. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post Magazine, Vogue, Allure, Self, The Missouri Review, Brain, Child, Creative Nonfiction, The Sun and elsewhere. The winner of a Pushcart Prize as well as fellowships to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, her essays and stories have been published in THE BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS, THE BEST NEW AMERICAN VOICES, and other anthologies. Raised in Minnesota, Strayed now lives in Portland, Oregon.

[…] general. Although I was motivated to attend because I think her essays The Love of My Life, and Heroin/e are perfect examples of writing, I think this environment of vulnerability and honesty did […]

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Heroin Essay Research Paper An introduction to

Heroin Essay Research Paper An introduction to

Heroin Essay, Research Paper

An introduction to Heroin-

The use of hard drugs in America is on a steady rise. Heroin is one of the biggest reasons for this. Heroin is one of the most dangerous highly addictive drugs on the black market today. A board member on the National Institute of Health estimated that there are currently about 600,000 heroin addicts in the U.S. alone. Only an estimated 115,000 thousand of those addicts have been admitted into a treatment program. As the demand grows greater for this substance, the purity gets greater, the market gets bigger and the problem gets worse.

Heroin is an illegal, highly addictive drug. It is both the most abused and the most rapidly growing drug in the opiate family. It is typically sold as a white or brownish powder. There is also a form that is black and sticky known on the streets as black tar heroin. Opiates are drugs that are derived from a naturally occurring substance found in the poppy plant. Although the purity of the heroin that reaches the streets is becoming greater, most street heroin is cut or diluted. Usually this is done with another drug, or a substance such as sugar, starch, powdered milk, or quinine. Street heroin can also be cut with strychnine or other poisons. The reason heroin is one of the most deadly drugs is because there are varying rates at which the drug is diluted. Therefore a user never knows exactly how pure the drug is, hence, they do not know how much of the drug they should take, often leading to an overdose. Like alcohol, heroin is a depressant that slows down all the body functions. But heroin differs from alcohol in two very significant ways. It does not destroy body organs, like the liver or kidney, the way alcohol does. That is why heroin dependency can last for years. Second, an abuser usually does not die from the symptoms experienced from the withdrawal although it may often feel like the user s body is being torn from the inside out. This is so unpleasant it drives many addicts back for another hit. The deaths associated with heroin are from overdosing rather than withdrawal. These so-called good differences are now being peddled to a new generation that has been bombarded with the negative effects of other addictive drugs like alcohol and cocaine.

There are three common ways in which to take the drug. The most common form is intravenously through a needle. You can also sniff the powder form, or smoke it. Because needles are often the most popular way to take the drug, making needle sharing a very common practice. This leaves heroin users with a high risk of catching HIV, hepatitis, or a number of other diseases. The National Institute of Health released data, which said that up to 50 percent of all heroin users eventually contract HIV. These startling numbers have pushed some city s to starting programs that provide free needles for anyone that wants them, in theory cutting down on needle sharing. These programs are in huge debate among congress. One side says that the needle sharing programs do not show significant cuts on needle sharing, but what they do accomplish is promoting the use of heroin, and making it easier. The other side of the argument says that in cities where the needle sharing programs were put into effect; the rate of HIV went down considerably. HIV, and AID’s contraction rates, has proven to be directly related to the amount of heroin users in an area.

How heroin is perceived by the American public-

Often heroin is perceived very differently, depending on what person you are talking to. Among middle and upper class adults in America, the drug is often shunned. Many people in this status seem to block out that fact that the drug or a problem with it even exists, because they themselves are rarely directly subjected to viewing the drug taking hold of someone s life. This ignorance of it, is often what blinds them to the fact that their very own child or niece or nephew maybe getting involved with it. Although middle and upper class Americans like to ignore the fact that there is a problem with the drug, there ideas about it change when their kid is rushed to the emergency room from and overdose, or a heroin addict trying to support his or her habit robs them.

Where as middle and upper class Americans like to deny the fact that millions of Americans suffer from them or someone they know using the drug, lower class Americans are often very aware of it, and effected by it. In the inner city, heroin use is not uncommon, and most of the lower class adults in America live in the inner city, so that it has become an everyday part of life for many of them. The heavy use of this drug, and the crime associated with it often leave the inner city s run down and economically unstable. Making it very hard for even straight clean people to survive themselves let alone feed a family.

Teenagers of course have a completely different understanding of drugs in general. Where they are curious and open minded about such things, adults are not. Upper and middle class suburban teenagers usually don t know much about the drug or what it does. This is the same ignorance that often leads them into using it. Often to this culture, heroin is just something that they see stories on the news about, but they feel that they would never do such a thing, until they do it. As far as the lower class teenager goes, it is an entirely different story. These kids are often brought up seeing it used and sold on a daily basis by the time they reach 12 or 13. What brings these kids to use it is usually curiosity of it. Seeing it everyday they begin to wonder what its all about. The poor poverty life that comes with the use of it, does not seem that bad to them, because that is what they are used to. The American government sees heroin as a widely growing problem, and is often considered a growing epidemic. There has been large debate as of recently, about how exactly an addiction to this drug should be treated. Often the addicts of this drug are look at by the rest of society as trash not worth saving. Heroin addicts almost always realize they have a major problem, but usually feel that the effort needed to quit, is just not worth it. They realize it is a problem but they are content with it.

What the drug does to the family and people around the user-

Heroin is a drug that destroys entire families. As the user starts to use heroin at first, it seems there is no problem, the parents of the user often don t even know about it. But almost always, the user will start stealing from their parents and family and even friends. When caught and cornered the addict will usually rebel in some way. This often turns into a huge fight. It isn t until a blowout fight like one of these happens, that the parents of the user finally realize that THEIR kid is a heroin addict. Many times younger siblings will follow in the path of their older sibling, and the cycle will start over again. Many heroin addicts are out on the street by themselves even by the age of 16 and sometimes less. The actions of the children in these family s many times lead to the parents divorce. Slowly but surely, like an infection, the drug will tear apart almost any family that it encounters.

A long dark path to addiction-

Heroin is a drug that can reach anyone. From a middle school honor roll student, to a college grad that made the dean s list, to a prostitute on the streets of Los Angeles. The path to heroin starts out very innocently. A rebellious teenager gives into a lot of peer pressure, and decides to take a hit of a cigarette. Once that is done, that downward spiral starts. After the teenager has become numb to the idea that cigarettes are bad, alcohol seems more and more enticing. After the rush of getting drunk becomes a bore, Marijuana may come into play. Once a teenager reaches this point, there are really two roads that they can choose. The one road, leads them into harder more powerful drugs, with greater addictions, such as heroin. The other road is a teenager that decides, enough is enough, and still has a chance to turn back and write off the previous drug use as any teenager rebellion. Much to often the first path is followed. Once the subject decides to take that first hit of the drug, it is almost always completely downhill from there.

The type of people to go down the deadly path of heroin addiction, are often those that come from low-income struggling families with a past of drug addiction. To these people, heroin and other hard drugs just seem like the natural thing to do. The disturbing thing is that even a kid from a upper middle class family on his or her way to college, can also be engulfed by the clothes of heroin. These users are usually the same people that 5 years ago, told themselves that they would never do such a thing. Users of heroin are often people that like to live on the edge. These are the sorts of self-destructive people that give themselves an artificial happiness by putting themselves or others in dangerous situations. One anonymous user of heroin was quoted say this, I am a fifty-nine year old man who first started to use heroin as a student at a Connecticut prep school in 1955. My father planned for me to attend Yale University and Yale Law School, but I always took the easiest way out in those years, becoming addicted to heroin at sixteen and leaving school at seventeen to live on the streets of Harlem. This is a classic example of the user that never believed that it would happen to them.

Heroin and other hard drugs are ways for kids to rebel against society. It is there way of giving society the finger. Often drug campaign s are too based on telling kids not to do the drug, where they should be trying to inform kids on what the drug can do to you and everyone you care about. If more kids knew exactly what they were getting into before they decided to take that first hit, maybe they could find a less destructive way of rebelling. The media is not helping, with the portrayal of the heroin addict model, living the high-life in Manhattan, or the street-wise guy in a movie called Pulp Fiction, heroin is almost glamorized. The big attraction to heroin for most kids and young adults though, is the fact that it is the last thing that society wants them to do. Instead of preaching against the use of heroin, maybe somebody needs to preach about it.

Реферат: Heroine Essay Research Paper For most of

Heroine Essay, Research Paper

For most of us, the word Heroin evokes the idea of something evil, something with a life of its own, a hunter of souls bent on destroying lives. We believe that heroin “hooks” those who try it, dooming them to ruin and even death, omnipresent in their lives, omnipowerful. After all, it’s a “monkey on their backs,” and a malevolent monkey at that. Those who try heroin have no choice–they become addicted, junkies for life, or so we believe.

Like anything said often enough, heroin stereotypes become accepted as truisms, which isn’t always the case. Heroin stereotypes serve society in that they warn us of danger, and heroin is a very dangerous drug. In spite of this warning, however, heroin stereotypes fail society when the danger signals becomes transformed. One result of this transformation is that we begin to anthropomorphize heroin. A metamorphosis takes place. Heroin takes on a mysterious life of its own, stripping people’s will from them and determining them to a life of addiction, suffering, and eventual death. We begin to think of heroin as some sort of entity.

I was seriously interested in understanding the attraction to this drug, an attraction powerful enough (according to The Household Survey On Drug Abuse and The Statistical Analysis of the United States) that in 1996 2.4 million people had used heroin at some point in their lives and 265,000 people were addicted. Understandably, the anthropomorphic confusion and stereotypical inaccuracy girdling the subject of heroin did not satisfy my interest. I was under the impression, from the stereotypes on heroin, that the first feeling was so wonderful, that the individual trying it couldn’t help but try it again and again, until the afflicted individual was completely addicted.

Due to my confusion regarding heroin’s appeal, I decided that subjective experience was a necessary condition for a clearer understanding of heroin’s allure. I know, I know, “What if the stories were true, and I would have become a hopeless junkie?” What if, indeed. What if I yank out a molar, put it under my pillow, and the tooth fairy leaves me a million dollars? Reason and logic are no more our enemy than heroin is. After years of studying philosophy and logic both in and out of school, I have learned to distinguish the difference between coherent and consistent information, the foundation of knowledge, and that of metaphorical hyperbole. In this case, the problem of coherency and consistency manifests itself in the contradictory belief that heroin is an inanimate object devoid of life, but at the same time, and in some mysterious way, controls people.

Yet a first hand experience of heroin would come with a price–Once I experienced heroin, I would be stereotyped myself. An eternal fact about experience is that you have it forever, and no amount of thinking or wishing can undo that fact. The cost of knowledge is sometimes high. With this in mind, I set out to find this infamous drug. I made the decision beforehand to smoke it, not inject it (injection is the preferred method). Once I put myself in an environment conducive to such acquisitions, one question was enough to obtain a dose large enough for two inexperienced people. (Having the foresight that my inexperienced fumbling might ruin a portion, I requested double my needs.)

In less than thirty minutes, I had the heroin. The cost: $20.00. It looked like a ball of road tar, black and sticky, with a sharp and unpleasant chemical smell, about the size of a large house fly. This form of heroin is the California version. It comes from Mexico, and from its appearance, it gets its name: “Mexican Tar Heroin.” Anyway, I finally arrived home, and in great anticipation, fabricated a crude tin foil pipe to smoke the heroin from. Tar heroin melts when heated, boils, and then begins to evaporate into a thick, white smoke. The smoke is then inhaled. Heating and inhaling heroin from a small piece of tin foil is called “Chasing the Dragon,” which exemplifies the metaphorical hyperbole behind this drug.

Well I did just that, sat down, and waited for the heroin monster to manifest itself, a monster said to enslave the will of men and women and determining them to ruin. Immediately I noticed that my eyes would not focus. The words on the page jumped around. I gave up trying to read. The best description regarding the cerebral aspect of the experience that I can muster is that of a strong, thick, and gluey feeling, greatly diminishing the analytic aspect of thought. The physical aspect was relaxing, and my entire body felt heavy and dense. Despite that fact, the physical feeling wasn’t nearly the ecstasy I had expected.

I wanted to understand why people dedicate their lives to a routine of searching for and using this drug. I couldn’t understand why before I smoked it, and I felt like I was no closer to understanding why now. After about fifteen minutes, I decided to smoke a bit more. After all, a dose large enough to justify the experience of the drug was necessary.

Once again, I was rewarded with an increased sense of druggedness: a heavy physical feeling and a general slowing down of my thought processes. The feeling was again agreeable. Yet I couldn’t help thinking that this couldn’t be what keeps so many people coming back in the face of physical addiction, the dismantling and destruction of their lives, and in many cases, death. So I indulged myself yet again.

This time what needed to be done was done. I was lapsing in and out of consciousness, if consciousness is what one might call it. The lapsing in and out of consciousness is called, colloquially and quite accurately, “nodding off.” I wouldn’t equate the heroin induced state of consciousness with our generally accepted understanding of the term “consciousness,” however. They are not similar. For instance, while nodding off, I couldn’t think or contemplate in any normal sense. I also felt nauseous unless I lay, unmoving, flat on my back. So there I was, lying flat on my back, unable to think, not wanting to move, and nodding in and out of what I will call a between state–that is, between consciousness and unconsciousness. I am at a loss to better explain it. The experience is definitely not one of thought and contemplation, as I simply couldn’t think much at all. Upon reflection, the best I can put into words my experience is that of missing time, lasting about five hours. And as Einstein said, no time, no knowledge–no nothing as far as our cognitive understanding of the world is concerned!

After a while, I set out for bed and slept well, except for fits of itching, which I am told is a symptom of heroin use. I drifted off to sleep thinking, “How could that experience be attractive to anyone?” The next morning, and once again in full possession of my thinking faculties, I had at least one answer. Here’s why.

Heroin virtually destroys the act of higher thought: Worry, fear, want, need–these thoughts are virtually nonexistent. It does this by inhibiting the brains ability to think abstractly. Contemplation, of fear, worry, want, need, even joy is the product of abstract thought. For example, happiness is the product of our ability to reflect upon our experiences. As humans, we know we are happy, and we know it by reflecting upon ourselves and our experiences: “Oh yeah, I’m having fun skiing! I’m enjoying myself in the company of my friends,” and so on. We acknowledge that we feel good, bad, or indifferent, and that acknowledgement is the result of our ability to think abstractly. We are, that is, cognitively aware of our states of consciousness.

When on heroin, thinking abstractly is nearly, if not completely, impossible. Hence, heroin, at certain dosages, can be a total escape into oblivion, for the ability to think abstractly is devastated. Thinking becomes rudimentary at best. This is not to say that people who are addicted to heroin cannot function in society and cannot think. The person who I received the heroin from has worked his entire life.

The act of thinking on an abstract level, however, is greatly diminished, if not obliterated completely. What this means is that some people who are addicted to heroin can function in society and complete their tasks, but I seriously doubt that anyone could accomplish, for instance, theoretical physics, abstract philosophy, or learn calculus while high on heroin. This is, of course, a matter of degree depending on the dosage and the time before and after the drug is introduced into the individual’s system. The main point is that heroin, at some point, greatly restricts our ability to think on an abstract level, a level necessary for feeling emotions such as fear and pain. In other words, depending on the dosage and the time elapsed after the introduction into the system, heroin takes the edge off or completely obliterates the pains of life.

My admittedly inexperienced estimation is that at some point the pains and stresses of life become such a burden that a thoughtless-ness existence, as far as abstract thinking is concerned, is preferable. For where there is an absences or great diminishing of abstract thought, there is also the absences or great diminishing of psychological stress, trauma, and pain.

Again, when on heroin, there is no worry, fear, want, or need, for the brain’s ability to produce those thoughts has been arrested. The human brain becomes much the same as a lower animal in the sense that it is cognitively unaware of the psychological aspects of worry, fear, and pain. That is to say, a dog, for instance, hasn’t the ability to contemplate such things: When experiencing the full power of heroin, neither have we. This is not to say that heroin users are dogs, for they are not. The point is that our normal ability to think abstractly is greatly diminished, resulting in a decrease, if not obliteration, of the user’s psychological pains.

This was my epiphany: The reason for using heroin isn’t because of physical ecstasy or because heroin controls people, but to escape the thought processes that bring with them the psychological pain those processes produce. Heroin use is a temporary escape from the human condition–hopelessness, purposelessness, the future, depression, and even day to day processes incurred simply by being a living, breathing person.

The attraction to heroin, as I experienced it, is that there is nothing, nothing to worry about, fear, want, or need, for the brain’s ability to bring such thoughts into existence has been destroyed, or at least greatly diminished (Yes, it’s a matter of degree). When under a dose of heroin, you do not choose to stop contemplation because the very ability to contemplate is on holiday.

For these reasons, then, once the user is back in the “real world,” the urge to return to cognitive nonbeing is preferred. What’s more, once the user is physically addicted, that urge is further justified by physical need. I said in the beginning that all experiences have their consequences, and the heroin experience is no exception. By escaping all pain, we also escape that which makes us human–the will, abstract thought, feelings, emotions, even the human idea of self.

The effect of the drug itself is the eradication of abstract thought; the attraction to this drug is the state achieved by the absence of abstract thought, for the absence of abstract thought is also the absence of will and want; the result of the absence of will and want is the absence of psychological pain.

Ironically, the obliteration of pain by the eradication of abstract thought greatly diminishes or destroys the human experience of life. For some, that state of existence is preferred. This is what it is to experience heroin.

Реферат на тему Heroin Essay Research Paper An introduction to

Heroin Essay, Research Paper

An introduction to Heroin-

The use of hard drugs in America is on a steady rise. Heroin is one of the biggest reasons for this. Heroin is one of the most dangerous highly addictive drugs on the black market today. A board member on the National Institute of Health estimated that there are currently about 600,000 heroin addicts in the U.S. alone. Only an estimated 115,000 thousand of those addicts have been admitted into a treatment program. As the demand grows greater for this substance, the purity gets greater, the market gets bigger and the problem gets worse.

Heroin is an illegal, highly addictive drug. It is both the most abused and the most rapidly growing drug in the opiate family. It is typically sold as a white or brownish powder. There is also a form that is black and sticky known on the streets as black tar heroin. Opiates are drugs that are derived from a naturally occurring substance found in the poppy plant. Although the purity of the heroin that reaches the streets is becoming greater, most street heroin is cut or diluted. Usually this is done with another drug, or a substance such as sugar, starch, powdered milk, or quinine. Street heroin can also be cut with strychnine or other poisons. The reason heroin is one of the most deadly drugs is because there are varying rates at which the drug is diluted. Therefore a user never knows exactly how pure the drug is, hence, they do not know how much of the drug they should take, often leading to an overdose. Like alcohol, heroin is a depressant that slows down all the body functions. But heroin differs from alcohol in two very significant ways. It does not destroy body organs, like the liver or kidney, the way alcohol does. That is why heroin dependency can last for years. Second, an abuser usually does not die from the symptoms experienced from the withdrawal although it may often feel like the user s body is being torn from the inside out. This is so unpleasant it drives many addicts back for another hit. The deaths associated with heroin are from overdosing rather than withdrawal. These so-called good differences are now being peddled to a new generation that has been bombarded with the negative effects of other addictive drugs like alcohol and cocaine.

There are three common ways in which to take the drug. The most common form is intravenously through a needle. You can also sniff the powder form, or smoke it. Because needles are often the most popular way to take the drug, making needle sharing a very common practice. This leaves heroin users with a high risk of catching HIV, hepatitis, or a number of other diseases. The National Institute of Health released data, which said that up to 50 percent of all heroin users eventually contract HIV. These startling numbers have pushed some city s to starting programs that provide free needles for anyone that wants them, in theory cutting down on needle sharing. These programs are in huge debate among congress. One side says that the needle sharing programs do not show significant cuts on needle sharing, but what they do accomplish is promoting the use of heroin, and making it easier. The other side of the argument says that in cities where the needle sharing programs were put into effect; the rate of HIV went down considerably. HIV, and AID’s contraction rates, has proven to be directly related to the amount of heroin users in an area.

How heroin is perceived by the American public-

Often heroin is perceived very differently, depending on what person you are talking to. Among middle and upper class adults in America, the drug is often shunned. Many people in this status seem to block out that fact that the drug or a problem with it even exists, because they themselves are rarely directly subjected to viewing the drug taking hold of someone s life. This ignorance of it, is often what blinds them to the fact that their very own child or niece or nephew maybe getting involved with it. Although middle and upper class Americans like to ignore the fact that there is a problem with the drug, there ideas about it change when their kid is rushed to the emergency room from and overdose, or a heroin addict trying to support his or her habit robs them.

Where as middle and upper class Americans like to deny the fact that millions of Americans suffer from them or someone they know using the drug, lower class Americans are often very aware of it, and effected by it. In the inner city, heroin use is not uncommon, and most of the lower class adults in America live in the inner city, so that it has become an everyday part of life for many of them. The heavy use of this drug, and the crime associated with it often leave the inner city s run down and economically unstable. Making it very hard for even straight clean people to survive themselves let alone feed a family.

Teenagers of course have a completely different understanding of drugs in general. Where they are curious and open minded about such things, adults are not. Upper and middle class suburban teenagers usually don t know much about the drug or what it does. This is the same ignorance that often leads them into using it. Often to this culture, heroin is just something that they see stories on the news about, but they feel that they would never do such a thing, until they do it. As far as the lower class teenager goes, it is an entirely different story. These kids are often brought up seeing it used and sold on a daily basis by the time they reach 12 or 13. What brings these kids to use it is usually curiosity of it. Seeing it everyday they begin to wonder what its all about. The poor poverty life that comes with the use of it, does not seem that bad to them, because that is what they are used to. The American government sees heroin as a widely growing problem, and is often considered a growing epidemic. There has been large debate as of recently, about how exactly an addiction to this drug should be treated. Often the addicts of this drug are look at by the rest of society as trash not worth saving. Heroin addicts almost always realize they have a major problem, but usually feel that the effort needed to quit, is just not worth it. They realize it is a problem but they are content with it.

What the drug does to the family and people around the user-

Heroin is a drug that destroys entire families. As the user starts to use heroin at first, it seems there is no problem, the parents of the user often don t even know about it. But almost always, the user will start stealing from their parents and family and even friends. When caught and cornered the addict will usually rebel in some way. This often turns into a huge fight. It isn t until a blowout fight like one of these happens, that the parents of the user finally realize that THEIR kid is a heroin addict. Many times younger siblings will follow in the path of their older sibling, and the cycle will start over again. Many heroin addicts are out on the street by themselves even by the age of 16 and sometimes less. The actions of the children in these family s many times lead to the parents divorce. Slowly but surely, like an infection, the drug will tear apart almost any family that it encounters.

A long dark path to addiction-

Heroin is a drug that can reach anyone. From a middle school honor roll student, to a college grad that made the dean s list, to a prostitute on the streets of Los Angeles. The path to heroin starts out very innocently. A rebellious teenager gives into a lot of peer pressure, and decides to take a hit of a cigarette. Once that is done, that downward spiral starts. After the teenager has become numb to the idea that cigarettes are bad, alcohol seems more and more enticing. After the rush of getting drunk becomes a bore, Marijuana may come into play. Once a teenager reaches this point, there are really two roads that they can choose. The one road, leads them into harder more powerful drugs, with greater addictions, such as heroin. The other road is a teenager that decides, enough is enough, and still has a chance to turn back and write off the previous drug use as any teenager rebellion. Much to often the first path is followed. Once the subject decides to take that first hit of the drug, it is almost always completely downhill from there.

The type of people to go down the deadly path of heroin addiction, are often those that come from low-income struggling families with a past of drug addiction. To these people, heroin and other hard drugs just seem like the natural thing to do. The disturbing thing is that even a kid from a upper middle class family on his or her way to college, can also be engulfed by the clothes of heroin. These users are usually the same people that 5 years ago, told themselves that they would never do such a thing. Users of heroin are often people that like to live on the edge. These are the sorts of self-destructive people that give themselves an artificial happiness by putting themselves or others in dangerous situations. One anonymous user of heroin was quoted say this, I am a fifty-nine year old man who first started to use heroin as a student at a Connecticut prep school in 1955. My father planned for me to attend Yale University and Yale Law School, but I always took the easiest way out in those years, becoming addicted to heroin at sixteen and leaving school at seventeen to live on the streets of Harlem. This is a classic example of the user that never believed that it would happen to them.

Heroin and other hard drugs are ways for kids to rebel against society. It is there way of giving society the finger. Often drug campaign s are too based on telling kids not to do the drug, where they should be trying to inform kids on what the drug can do to you and everyone you care about. If more kids knew exactly what they were getting into before they decided to take that first hit, maybe they could find a less destructive way of rebelling. The media is not helping, with the portrayal of the heroin addict model, living the high-life in Manhattan, or the street-wise guy in a movie called Pulp Fiction, heroin is almost glamorized. The big attraction to heroin for most kids and young adults though, is the fact that it is the last thing that society wants them to do. Instead of preaching against the use of heroin, maybe somebody needs to preach about it.